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20130117
20130117
STATION
WHUT (Howard University Television) 4
FBC 3
KQED (PBS) 3
KRCB (PBS) 3
WETA 3
CSPAN2 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
FOX News
Jan 17, 2013 1:00pm PST
time, their workers but that comes with a cost to the whole economy, making it less dynamic, less easy for businesses to hire more workers and at a time when we have 8% unemployment, that's not something that a lot of businesses can afford. >> now, a lot of those same union leaders say, you get what you pay for, and there are offering cut raitt salaries to workers who might appreciate the jobs, but in the end, aren't going to be very happy in those jobs. what do you think? >> i think overall people are gibbing to see that unions are out to help union worker but very often at the expense of nonunion works and that's where we're getting in trouble. the american public at large is overwhelmingly moving sort of -- public support is moving against unions, gallup found that 42% would like to see unions be less influential. they feel at if there are negotiations going on for union workers but they come at a cost for all workers, creating less opportunity for all workers and for the economy at large. what is the message. you say lab you wins every time. unions say, cheaper labor has a cos
FOX News
Jan 17, 2013 3:00am PST
? it's hard enough getting jobs right now in this economy. veterans' unemployment is a little bit higher than the national rate. then you have people who are dealing with some type of wound as they try to get back into the workforce. do we have to curry the jobs towards their skills? >> no, i don't think so. i think these disabled veterans bring lots of skills and leadership skills as well as the breadth and depth of experience they had in the services back to local communities. what has occurred is the u.s. army in 2007 asked the national organization on disabilities to help develop a solution to this problem, and they created three locations in north carolina, texas and colorado to work very closely with these stabled veterans. it was one on one with other veterans working with veterans, primarily disabled with disabled, very career-intensive veterans centric and focused on transitioning them back into civil society. the success rate has been over 70% of those veterans after 18 months have a job or they're in some sort of educational environment to include vocational training. i
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2013 6:00am EST
, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said that information about the fu
FOX Business
Jan 17, 2013 5:00pm EST
of expectations and its shares turned negative after-hours. >>> good news on the u.s. economy led to an early slide for gold. swung back late in the session and hit a one-month high settles at 1690.80 an ounce. >>> our top story is the frightening situation in algeria where a botched attempt to free hostages from bp's natural gas complex turned deadly. al algerian source tells reuters 30 hostages were killed. seven foreigners, two japanese, one britain, a french national. seven americans are missing. the white house is saying some are not accounted for. fox news learned two americans are on their way to london. bp is pulling nonessential personnel out of algeria. details here still very fluid. there is a lot of conflicting reports out there. here to help us sort it out, john bolton, former ambassador to the united nations. he is also a fox news contributor. i want to start out, can you put this in perspective for us. how big of a deal is it to the u.s.? >> i think we should consider it very significant. even though it is in algeria a long way away. when you combine it with the hostilities in
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 6:00pm PST
newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org captioning sponsored by wpbt >> this is n.b.r. >> susie: good evening everyone. i'm susie gharib. blockbuster earnings from j.p. morgan, and goldman sachs. but will they be able to keep up the pace? >> tom: i'm tom hudson. the growing concern over america's ability to pay its i.o.u.s is turning into a debate over the definition of a "debt default." why washington's wrangling could hurt the u.s. economy. >> susie: and from chipotle to dunkin' donuts, did fast
PBS
Jan 17, 2013 12:00am PST
this era of underemployment and structural issues in the economy. >> you think the ipad is the most important new development since the i.b.m. p.c.? >> i do. >> rose: because? >> because it -- i'll start with if you look at the time of day the most common time of day for people to use their ipad is between 6:00 p.m. and when they go to sleep. when what is that known in your line of work? that's known as prime time. and it turns out the ipad isn't the second screen when people are watching t.v. for people over the age of 40, when they're in bed watching t.v. with their ipad, the ipad's actually the thing they're paying attention to and the t.v. is the background noise, if something happens they look up and look at it. why is that important? first of all could you have imagine five years ago that there would be a product that would go from zero to 50 million yunz overnight and the single most common thing to do would be to read in the bed at night? a technology product? that was to me unimaginable five years ago. so i look at this and i wonder what is there anything it cannot do that'
FOX Business
Jan 16, 2013 7:00pm EST
, according to respondents of the latest gallup poll looking at the deficit and the economy and unemployment is far more important. public policy in washington. the president is going after our guns, unveiling the most sweeping set of gun-control proposals and nearly two decades here is this moments. the reason that there is so for the second amendment to prevail despite his assault. the decade-long assault weapons ban, which ran from 1994, it did not work. 1994 was a different year, by the way, then this year, 2013. and the political conditions are quite different because the reality of america is quite different. it is important to look back and think about the fact that in '94, the house, the senate, and the white house were all controlled by democrats. today republicans control just the house as the president likes to constantly remind us. back then president clinton pushed the assault weapons ban as part of a broader crime bill. it was not just an imperious and grabbed, but it was an important piece of legislation, and it was a different time. despite the prosperity, the american public
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 5:30pm PST
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the enginehat nnects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your bs station om viewers like u. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
NBC
Jan 17, 2013 7:00am PST
401(k) into a fidelity ira and take control of your personal economy. this is going to be helpful. call or come in today. fidelity investments. turn here. >>> we are back at 8:21 with oils scar and tony-winning actress, catherine zeta-jones. she place the wife of a corrupt mayor in "broken city." >> when her husband hires a priva privateer to track her, she says he is following the wrong story. >> this is not what you think it is mr. taggert. >> i get fide take pitch perrers, not think. >> if that woman you put down the bottle for means anything, if the last seven years of your life means anything, walk away. if you think you are investigating adultery, mr. taggert, you don't know nicholass who set nicholas s who st very well. >> catherine zeta-jones, good morning to you. we want to talk about this movie is a good one. first we saw you at the golden globes the other night, you were a presenter which i think would be-racking than as a nominee. you sang your opening line. >> node choice. going to the nerves, i get nervous walking down a red carpet, literally, it's always nerve-racki
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)